J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University

1. Does your law school intentionally seek out LGBTQ+ prospective students?
Yes
a. If so, how and where are your efforts directed?

We seek to admit a diverse student body that reflects a wide range of life experiences. Although our application does not request prospective students to identify their gender identity or sexual orientation, applicants may indicate in the Candidate Referral Service profile they set up with LSAC that they are LGBTQ+ and/or interested in LGBTQ+ issues and student organizations. When prospective students provide such information, we strive to make them feel welcome and included at BYU Law.

2. Does your law school's welcome packet for admitted students include mention of identity group support for LGBTQ+ students, as well as for students of color or other minorities?
No

When we send students an offer of admission, we include a brief overview of certain academic resources within the Law School, but we have not included information about any special interest groups in this packet. The Law School’s Assistant Dean of Students meets individually with all entering students to understand their interests, assess their needs, and inform them of relevant resources. Among the resources available to LGBTQ+ students is the Office of Student Success and Inclusion, which offers LGBTQ+-specific outreach.

3. Does your school offer students the option to self-identify as LGBTQ+ in admissions applications or post-enrollment forms?
No
4. Does your law school offer transgender students who have not legally changed their names the ability to have their name of choice on admission applications or post enrollment forms?
Yes

All students are allowed to specify a “preferred name” on their admission application, and we use this name in subsequent communications from the Admissions Office. Students are also allowed to use a preferred name on their diplomas, but their transcripts use their legal name.

5. Does your law school provide any annual scholarships specifically for LGBTQ+ students?
No
6. Does your law school provide funding, including travel support, for LGBTQ+ students to participate in LGBTQ+-focused learning and career services opportunities?
Yes
a. If so, please provide details and examples of when and how those opportunities have been utilized.

The Law School provides funding, including travel support, for students, including LGBTQ+ students, to participate in learning and career services opportunities. For example, one of our LGBTQ+ students received funding support to work as an intern for the ACLU’s LGBT Project in New York City.

7. Does your law school actively seek to employ diverse staff/faculty/administrators, including visible, out LGBTQ+ individuals?
Yes
a. If so, please detail how and where recruitment efforts are directed

We seek to employ a diverse staff/faculty/administration, reflecting a wide range of life experiences. The Law School’s Policy on Non-discrimination (see above) expressly includes hiring of faculty and employees and proscribes “discrimination or segregation on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, national origin, sex, gender (including identity and expression), sexual orientation, age, or disability.”

8. Please identify, to your knowledge, how many out LGBTQ+ faculty your law school employs (if any)
The decision of a faculty member to publicly identify as LGBTQ+ is personal, and we do not collect or disseminate that information.
9. Please identify, to your knowledge, how many out LGBTQ+ staff/administrators?
The decision of a staff member or administrator to publicly identify as LGBTQ+ is personal, and we do not collect or disseminate that information.
10. Does your law school provide benefits such as health insurance, family medical leave, parental leave, and nontraditional family planning such as in vitro fertilization and/or adoptive benefits on equal terms to same-sex couples who are married or in registered domestic partnerships as are provided to different-sex married or registered domestic partner couples?
No
a. If so, please summarize or reproduce your policy here
11. Does your law school offer the aforementioned health benefits to students and their same-sex spouses/partners?
No
a. If so, please summarize or reproduce your policy here
12. Does your law school offer transition-related health benefits to transgender and/or transitioning employees?
No
a. If so, please summarize or reproduce your policy here
13. Does your school offer the same transition-related healthcare benefits to students and their partners/spouses?
No
a. If so, please summarize or reproduce your policy here (or you may email a copy of your policy to rishell@lgbtbar.org):
14. Do all students at your law school have access to counseling and/or therapy services either through the law school or the larger University?
Yes

Yes. The University counseling center is available to law students and our Dean of Students works closely with the Clinical Director of the University counseling center to meet the individualized needs of law students. The Law School is in the process of hiring a dedicated counselor for law students, housed at the Law School. We hope to have this professional in place for the next school year. Student access to counseling is free and confidential, and counseling can be on any topic.

15. Does your law school provide at least bi-annual mandatory diversity and inclusion training that incorporates robust LGBTQ+ curriculum, for all staff/faculty/administrators?
Yes

The staff members of the Law School have had both Title IX and diversity/inclusion training as recently as last week. We offered Title IX training to faculty, administration, staff, and students earlier in January. Title IX deals with being respectful in all relationships. To ensure thorough training at regular intervals, the Law School recently created a new position for a Director of Human Resources and Employee Development/Training. This person will coordinate training initiatives to enhance employee skills, performance, and productivity. Likewise, strategies to enhance employee engagement and retention will be further developed. These initiatives will include diversity and inclusion training consistent with our commitment to helping those associated with the Law School to feel welcome and included.

16. Does your law school provide a gender-inclusive restroom in any and/or all law school buildings?
Yes
a. How is that restroom identified (i.e., what does the signage say, is it identified on building maps, is there a gender-inclusive restroom policy that applies to all restrooms and where is that statement published, etc.)?

In the summer of 2018, the Law School created two gender-inclusive restrooms that provide for individual use. We now have three such restrooms, each designated “Restroom.”

17. Does your law school have one or more annual LGBTQ+ course offerings (e.g., LGBT Law and Policy, Sexual Orientation and the Law, Gender and the Law (taught with trans-inclusive and focused materials), etc.)?
Yes
a. If so, please list course names

The Law School offers courses that include LGBTQ+-focused content, including Family Law, Fourteenth Amendment, Freedom of Religion, and Social Thought & Feminist Legal Theory.

18. Does your law school have an active, visible LGBTQ+ law student group that is supported by the institution?
No

The Law School does not have such a student group.

19. Does your law school have a hate/bias incident policy that students are required to follow?
Yes
a. If so, does that process specifically identify sexual orientation, gender identity, or both as protected categories?

BYU’s Honor Code Statement provides, “As a matter of personal commitment, the faculty, administration, staff, and students of Brigham Young University … seek to demonstrate in daily living on and off-campus those moral virtues encompassed in the gospel of Jesus Christ, and will … [r]espect others.” The Law School has participated with the University in its efforts to promote respect for others, including LGBTQ+ members of our community. For example, BYU recently released a video on Instagram and YouTube on the importance of respecting others. See https://youtu.be/DryUIXptxLw

b. is there a clear hate bias/incident reporting process for students/faculty/staff to utilize if necessary?
Yes
20. Please describe all additional ways, not identified through your responses, that your law school works to be safe, inclusive, and welcoming to LGBTQ+ students, faculty, and administrators:

We are committed to the doctrine that every human being has worth and dignity as a child of God. God loves all his children alike, and we take seriously the Christian charge to love one another as he loves us. (John 13:34) We recognize that we each fall short of this admonition, but it is our aspiration. Several faculty members of the Law School are visibly active in supporting Encircle, a local LGBTQ+ family and youth resource center, and the Law School’s chapter of the American Constitution Society sponsored a service project at Encircle last semester. This semester, the Law School’s Public Interest Law Foundation is hosting an event with a local attorney who will be speaking about interacting with and helping LGBTQ+ clients. Recently, BYU hosted the NCAA Common Ground IV initiative. According to the NCAA website, “BYU was the first private, faith-based Division I institution to host Common Ground, which aims to establish inclusive and respectful athletics environments for participants of all sexual orientations, gender identities and religious beliefs.” To read more about Common Ground IV, visit ncaa.org/static/champion/breaking-ground and ncaa.org/static/champion/an-uncommon-conversation. Drawing on similar motivations, BYU Law aspires to establish inclusive and respectful environments for law students of all sexual orientations, gender identities and religious beliefs.